Getting Data In

time latency (Indextime and timestamp)?

New Member

Hello,

I'm trying to measure the time that data got ingested and the time it showed up on my search. I read that i have to use latency. i don't fully understand what it does, but I came up with this so far after i saw a couple examples:

| tstats count where index= * by _time _indextime index span=1ms
| eval latency=abs(_indextime-_time) 
| stats sum min(latency) avg(latency) max(latency) by index

My question is, is this the correct way to measure the time stamp and time it showed up on search ? if not what is the right way?

I'm also trying to get the results in MS so i used span=1ms . Is this correct ? Sorry for asking a lot of questions and thank you in advance!

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1 Solution

Ultra Champion

What exactly do you mean by "time it showed up on my search"?

I think your search more or less works, problem is, that span does not support subsecond accuracy, so if you need that, tstats isn't the way to go.

I've never done this using a tstats by _time and _indextime before though, so I might be missing some detailed nuances. Usually I run something like this. I typically am investigating a specific data feed (so a specific index) and want to see which hosts are having delays / timezone issues etc.

index= myIndex
| eval latency=abs(_indextime-_time) 
| stats min(latency) avg(latency) max(latency) by host

View solution in original post

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Path Finder

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New Member

Thank you, i'll check that out!

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Ultra Champion

Googling for splunk latency definition and we get -

-- Latency is the difference between the time assigned to an event (usually parsed from the text) and the time it was written to the index. ... In most production Splunk instances, the latency is usually just a few seconds.

When we speak about data that is being streamed in constantly, the time assigned to an event is practically the system time and therefore _indextime - _time measures the latency.

0 Karma

Ultra Champion

What exactly do you mean by "time it showed up on my search"?

I think your search more or less works, problem is, that span does not support subsecond accuracy, so if you need that, tstats isn't the way to go.

I've never done this using a tstats by _time and _indextime before though, so I might be missing some detailed nuances. Usually I run something like this. I typically am investigating a specific data feed (so a specific index) and want to see which hosts are having delays / timezone issues etc.

index= myIndex
| eval latency=abs(_indextime-_time) 
| stats min(latency) avg(latency) max(latency) by host

View solution in original post

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New Member

I'm trying to find the time when the data got ingested, stored, and available for analysis in search query. I want to see how long this process takes in ms or seconds and view the results on a dashboard. However, i just have't found an effiecent way to do that yet. So i was trying what i posted but not sure if thta's the right approch or not. Please help,Thank you!

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Influencer

That is the right approach to know the latency .

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New Member

Maybe i've asked this before but just to make sure, is latency tells you when was the data ingested and when did it show up on the search query ? or does it mean something else ? Beacuse i'm trying to see how log did it take for the data to be ingetsed and shows up on my Splunk query search. Thank you!

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Influencer

No it tells when the logs were ingested (indextime) versus when the logs were forwarded from the source system if the timestamp(time) is configured correctly from the logs .

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Ultra Champion

Indeed, what you're measuring with that search you shared is the delay between when the event took place on the source (time) and when the event was stored in Splunk (indextime).

Once it is indexed it is available for search, unless something is seriously wrong with your setup or you are worried about microsecond real-timeness I wouldn't really see why you'd want to analyse the delay between indextime and when the data is available in searchresults (if it would even be possible to have such a delay).

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New Member

Thank You!

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New Member

Thank You!

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